Knowledgebase : Troubleshooting / Networking

Often referred to as the cache, the Temporary Internet Files folder contains a kind of travel record of the items you have seen, heard, or downloaded from the Web, including images, sounds, Web pages, even cookies. Typically these items are stored in the Temporary Internet Files folder.

Storing these files in your cache can make browsing the Web faster because it usually takes your computer less time to display a Web page when it can call up some of the page's elements or even the entire page from your local Temporary Internet Files folder.

All those files stored in your cache take up space, so from time to time, you may want to clear out the files stored in your cache to free up some space on your computer. This is called clearing the cache. Clearing the cache will also force your browser to re-download any changes you have made to a web page that was once being stored on your computer.

Here's how to clear your cache in IE6, IE7 and Firefox 2.x:

IE6:
1. On the Internet Explorer 6 Tools menu, click Internet Options. The Internet Options box should open to the General tab.
2. On the General tab, in the Temporary Internet Files section, click the Delete Files button. This will delete all the files that are currently stored in your cache.
3. Click OK, and then click OK again.

IE7:
1. On the Internet Explorer Tools menu, click Internet Options.
2. On the General tab, in the Browsing history section, click the Delete... button. This will bring up the Delete Browsing History Box. Select the Delete files... button to delete Temporary Internet Files. After you select delete a box will appear asking you to confirm you would like to delete the files. Select Yes.
3. Click Yes again, and then click Close and OK again.


Firefox 2.x
1. Click Tools and select Options.
2. Click the Advanced icon and click the Network tab.
3. Click Clear Now under the Cache section.
4. Click Ok.
5. Exit and relaunch the browser.

Copy/pasting from a DOS window is one of those things that's very simple, yet annoyingly complicated to first figure out.

To highlight the text you wish to copy with the mouse pointer, right click on the DOS window and select the menu item "Mark".

Next, select the text you want to copy with the mouse cursor and once it's all highlighted, hit the right mouse button. The highlight should then disappear. Once that happens, the data should be in the clipboard and you should be able to paste it into an email or a text file to show to us.

tracert (traceroute): traceroute is a utility that records the route through the Internet between your computer and a destination computer. It also calculates the amount of time it takes for data to get to each stop along the way to the destination.The movement of data from one stop to another along the way is called a "hop." If your data is having problems going to or from our servers, it could be at any point along this journey. That's why we run the traceroute: so we can pinpoint where the problem is.

Running a Traceroute on Windows XP:

  1. Go to Start (start button on the lower left of the desktop)
  2. Choose 'Run'
  3. Type: "cmd" (no quotes)
  4. This should bring up a DOS prompt. Once there, type: "tracert yourdomain.com" (without quotes)

 

This should result in a series of hops from your computer to the server you are tracing to.

You can now copy and paste this info into a support request if we should ask you to send it to us.

Chances are you copied and pasted your content from a source that used it's own encoding for special characters. Since HTML doesn't know what to do with this, it will sometimes display garbage. Microsoft word does this a lot with it's special "smart quotes".

If you want to use these special characters you will need to change them to what are called "HTML Entities"

Find the symbol you want to use in this chart and replace the crazy characters you are seeing with the correct entitiy:

Output HTML Entity
space  
! !
" "
# #
$ $
% %
& &
' '
( (
) )
* *
+ +
, ,
- -
. .
/ /
0 0
1 1
2 2
3 3
4 4
5 5
6 6
7 7
8 8
9 9
: :
; &#59;
< &#60;
= &#61;
> &#62;
? &#63;
@ &#64;
a &#65;
b &#66;
c &#67;
d &#68;
e &#69;
f &#70;
g &#71;
h &#72;
i &#73;
j &#74;
k &#75;
l &#76;
m &#77;
n &#78;
o &#79;
p &#80;
q &#81;
r &#82;
s &#83;
t &#84;
u &#85;
v &#86;
w &#87;
x &#88;
y &#89;
z &#90;
[ &#91;

&#92;
] &#93;
^ &#94;
Output HTML Entity
_ &#95;
` &#96;
a &#97;
b &#98;
c &#99;
d &#100;
e &#101;
f &#102;
g &#103;
h &#104;
i &#105;
j &#106;
k &#107;
l &#108;
m &#109;
n &#110;
o &#111;
p &#112;
q &#113;
r &#114;
s &#115;
t &#116;
u &#117;
v &#118;
w &#119;
x &#120;
y &#121;
z &#122;
{ &#123;
| &#124;
} &#125;
~ &#126;
� &#161;
� &#162;
� &#163;
¤ &#164;
� &#165;
| &#166;
§ &#167;
" &#168;
© &#169;
� &#170;
� &#171;
� &#172;
­ &#173;
® &#174;
� &#175;
� &#176;
� &#177;
� &#178;
³ &#179;
´ &#180;
� &#181;
¶ &#182;
� &#183;
, &#184;
¹ &#185;
� &#186;
� &#187;
� &#188;
� &#189;
¾ &#190;
� &#191;
À &#192;
Output HTML Entity
Á &#193;
 &#194;
à &#195;
� &#196;
� &#197;
� &#198;
� &#199;
È &#200;
� &#201;
Ê &#202;
Ë &#203;
Ì &#204;
Í &#205;
ÃŽ &#206;
Ï &#207;
Ð &#208;
� &#209;
Ã’ &#210;
Ó &#211;
Ô &#212;
Õ &#213;
� &#214;
× &#215;
Ø &#216;
Ù &#217;
Ú &#218;
Û &#219;
� &#220;
Ý &#221;
Þ &#222;
� &#223;
� &#224;
� &#225;
� &#226;
ã &#227;
� &#228;
� &#229;
� &#230;
� &#231;
� &#232;
� &#233;
� &#234;
� &#235;
� &#236;
� &#237;
� &#238;
� &#239;
ð &#240;
� &#241;
� &#242;
� &#243;
� &#244;
õ &#245;
� &#246;
� &#247;
ø &#248;
� &#249;
� &#250;
� &#251;
� &#252;
ý &#253;
þ &#254;
ÿ &#255;
For example: http://001.2.03.04/~username

The temporary URL consisting of a numeric IP address or the server name followed by a tilde (~) and your username is a convenient way to access your new hosting account with WebNet Hosting before you change your nameservers to point to our network. However, due to recent PCI Compliance regulations this functionality has been disabled on many of our servers because it exposes the username of the account to the internet - and therefore, one half of the login credentials for a user's account. As a workaround you *may* be able to use this same address with https instead of http but even that may soon be considered a PCI failure.  

Try using the form: https://001.2.03.04/~username
PHPinfo is a function that returns information, in HTML form, about the PHP envirnment on your server (see http://us2.php.net/phpinfo for more information). To run PHPinfo you must save the following code in a file with a .php extension on your computer using a simple text editor:

<?php
phpinfo ();
?>

Upload the file to the web content folder of your domain using an FTP client or the File Manager. If your file is named "phpinfo.php", then you will run PHPinfo by using your web browser to go to "www.yourdomain.com/phpinfo.php".